The Big List of Class Discussion Strategies

Speed Dating is a discussion strategy that allows students to engage in several short discussions around a specific topic — from a factual conversation about a text to a discussion in which students share evidence-backed opinions on a topic. In this strategy, students read and annotate articles to learn about content material and annotate the articles in order to identify important information about an assigned topic or a topic of their choice. Determine the purpose of the Speed Dating activity. Will students interact with one another in order to:. Determine the format of the Speed Dating activity. Will all students be involved in researching one topic, which would allow for a whole class Speed Dating, or would the class be divided into groups to explore different topics? A recommended minimum should include 4 – 6 articles, which would allow for 2 – 3 rotations of Speed Dating on one topic. Locate the Cooperative Learning Chart in the resource section below, if needed, to use as a reference. Consider creating an organizational tool – a chart handwritten or digital – to track which topics have been assigned to which students. Refer to the examples in the resource section below.

Instructional strategies

At the start of a speed dating session, students are given a topic or question to discuss. Each student sits facing another student. Students typically remain in their partner-groups for about minutes before the instructor, who must keep time, notifies them to move on to their next partner. Once students rotate to their new partners, the timer is reset and students again discuss their topic or question, this time with a new discussion partner. The session proceeds in this manner, with each student thus getting the opportunity to interact with multiple other students in a series of brief one-on-one discussions Murphy,

Speed Dating: Teaching Strategy for the Classroom High School Classroom, It’s a simple strategy to use, and I’ll walk you through it here in about one minute.

The students should always be working harder than you. But once I stepped foot in the classroom and gained more experience, I recognized the value in her advice. Good teaching is working harder than your students, but great teaching is working a little less so that they can work more. Great teaching is orchestrating an engaging, student-centered learning experience. If this kind of philosophy sounds appealing, then here are 5 engaging, student-centered ELA strategies to try this year.

The Socratic Seminar is named after Greek philosopher Socrates, who believed in the power of social learning and deliberate discussion. Socrates believed that humans learned best from questioning and discussion. He believed discussion helped individuals critically think through complex ideas and learn better than they could on their own. My previous classroom, set up for a Socratic Seminar. Instead of you facilitating the discussion by asking questions, students take charge of their own learning in this activity by creating and asking the questions.

A Socratic Seminar is truly a student-centered and social approach to learning. For you, this means it is less prep work. It contains teacher instructions, pacing information, expectations, question types and examples, all student handouts, and rubrics. It is more than a lesson; it is a learning experience that engages every single student.

Synch your stopwatches: Idea Exchange set to foster sharing of teaching strategies

Speed Dating is a dynamic discussion strategy that supports students to analyze texts and respond to the ideas of others. To set up an initial Speed Dating exercise during class, teachers should prepare a series of questions related to an individual text or text set. Students can later be coached into writing their own questions based on the reading.

Great teaching is orchestrating an engaging, student-centered learning “Speed dating” is a student-centered lesson structure that you can.

Weinberg and Moussawi collaborated with the other faculty members teaching the capstone Information Systems project course to explore how students could give and receive higher quality peer feedback on team presentations. They compared two different presentation approaches. Next, teams changed pairings, and the process repeated. Students completed brief surveys after each project-sharing session, and a sampling of sessions was observed by a trained researcher. According to the surveys, students reported giving and receiving more helpful feedback during the speed dating sessions compared to sessions with serial, class-wide presentations.

Students also reported being significantly more engaged during the speed dating sessions. Classroom observations corroborated student perceptions, documenting a greater percentage of students participating actively during the speed-dating sessions compared to the traditional approach. Given these positive results, Weinberg, Moussawi, and colleagues are using speed dating for team presentations and feedback sessions more frequently in this Information Systems course.

Students reported giving and receiving more feedback, as well as being more engaged, during the speed dating events compared to the traditional presentations. A trained researcher observed more active participation during the speed dating compared to the traditional presentations. The distribution of observed engagement activity for speed dating and traditional presentation sessions can be seen in figure 2.

Without their help, I think it would have been a project that would not have gone anywhere. Read more: International Journal of Innovation in Education

Is “Speed Dating” More Engaging than Serial Presentations?

Last week the staff at Upton shared their good practice through the medium of speed dating. Due to confidence issues I find some students are reluctant to engage in practical tasks such as drawing. By allowing use of the app it is a virtual kiln where students can add pattern and colour etc , students are dealing with an interface they are familiar with virtuality.

The quick and effective results they achieve on the app used as a starter. Gives the students the confidence to move from the virtual to the physical process of making and problem solving. Miss French: I use a minimum work list which boys in particular really like and promotes independence.

Speed dating in your religion classroom. Describe a successful classroom teaching tactic that could be replicated Description of the strategy.

Subject: English. Course title: Research skills and academic methods. Level: BA, first semester. Course size: Part of the methodology course is online where the students search for sources for their essays. It proved hard for students to broaden keywords if they get too few hits or to narrow down keywords if they get too many.

During the activity I used to walk about the classroom and make myself available, but I found it hard to make time for all students when they needed my help. To be able to identify central concepts and ideas in a research question and to use these concepts in a systematic literature search. As a preparation, the students bring their proposed research question for an essay for another course — this course is a process course, so we collaborate on the content side with other courses in the semester.

“Speed Dating” Teaching Strategy

In Effective Teaching Strategies. January 20, Jacqueline S. Hodes EdD. The panel discussion is a valuable, time-tested teaching technique used in classrooms of all types to help students understand the experiences of a particular group of people. My previous experiences facilitating successful panel discussions led me to believe that a panel would be a good method to use here.

It was not.

In an educational setting.

Guest blog by Mrs. Across the country and throughout our great state, classrooms are transforming in an effort to engage students in meaningful learning. Teachers are revamping their teaching styles and lessons to reach students in a way that is fun and memorable. As a secondary social studies teacher, I had to become extra creative in order to find ways to make learning historical content and skills fun and exciting. I knew lectures and workbooks would keep the learner in a sedated state.

So how could I bring learning to life and get students to learn without even realizing it? In this blog, I will share out my speed dating activity and how I used in my 11th grade social studies classroom. Speed Dating The great thing about this activity is that it allows your students to explore a large amount of content in a 45 or minute class period and can be used in any subject area. Students work individually, in pairs, and then collaboratively.

Initially, I thought I was a genius but after researching, I realized it was not some new, unheard of idea. I introduced this activity in my Progressive Era unit. To better understand how it works, here is my breakdown for the period.

Current Events Speed Dating

Select your area of interest to begin exploring. The purpose of this assignment is to 1 expose students to current events in environmental science, 2 connect those stories to concepts covered in class, and 3 allow students to gain experience discussing important topics in environmental science. Students choose an article written in the last three months relevant to the field of environmental science.

Speed Dating can be used as an educational strategy where students are arranged as they would be in a speed dating situation with pairs of students seated.

I want to start the education part of my blog with one of my very favorite teaching strategies. I have found it especially effective with 9th graders. Finally, it gives the students various different perspectives and often challenges them to question, analyze, assess, and defend their own opinion. You are commenting using your WordPress. You are commenting using your Google account.

You are commenting using your Twitter account. You are commenting using your Facebook account. Notify me of new comments via email. Notify me of new posts via email. February 21, This can be done as a journaling or warm up excercise or can be given as homework.

Speed Dating using Newsela with Secondary Students

By Emily Schlesinger. PreK—K , 1—2 , 3—5 , 6—8. For years, professional development went a lot like this: 1 You sit. The community-driven experience creates a chemistry and a sense of common purpose not found in traditional PD. Finding a safe, supportive venue to bounce around ideas regularly—whether in a group face-to-face, on a blog, in a staff meeting, with a friend, or alone in your journal—can be crucial to professional growth.

Try one small change.

As the teacher I am the time keeper and circulate during the last ½ hour. In the second half of the seminar we follow up by discussing how to write a ‘literature.

Teaching materials are arranged in categories. Click on items to download and adapt for use in your own classroom. Scored Discussion Article. Sample Completed Teacher Scoring. Blank Teacher Scoring Sheet. Scored Discussion Score Sheets. Sample Central America Agendas. Sample Agenda for Book Discussions. Sample Note Taking Guide. Primary Grades Score Sheet. Math Scored Discussion Article.

Using the “Speed Dating” Model to Enhance Student Learning

In this class we will treat social theory as a lens for understanding the modern social world and constructing explanations for changes in society. There are three main course goals. First, we will consider the role of theory in sociological research. Third, we will weave together and apply the work of social theorists to the modern world in which we live in. We will accomplish these goals by reading original texts and empirical readings to examine how sociologists draw on theory to explain the modern world.

Classroom debate / discussion strategies, Comparing, Contrasting, Formulating final The speed-dating format is designed to help students spot The process then repeats for as long as the teacher feels appropriate.

Plus, they allow shyer and more introverted students to speak without feeling pressured. Here are eight of our favorites. Students form two lines, standing and facing each other. The teacher gives a topic or asks a question, which partners will discuss for a designated time period say, two minutes. Repeat with another conversational topic. Ask students to form two cocentric circles. Their new partner is the student they froze in front of. Each student receives half of a short dialogue, or one part of a question-and-answer pair.

The objective is to find their partner. Students receive their text, memorize it, and mingle with their classmates, listening until they find their match. Students must ask and answer questions to do this—which you may choose to pre-teach, depending on their level. Give small groups a set time to discuss a given topic.

When the time is up, half the members of each group swap with a neighboring group. Another classic mingle and an excellent ice-breaker.

Speed Dating: Teaching Strategy for the Classroom